Spanish A Final Exam

Comments 3 Standard

This is the final exam that my Spanish A students took today: Spanish A Final Exam 2012

I am not proud of it because it isn’t particularly academic–there is no cultural/real aspect to it–but it was somewhat student generated, which I think is a good thing. Both reading sections were free writes written by students in my classes. It includes a good range of vocabulary and structures that we have studied throughout the year, but not great. I did not include a speaking portion to the exam because our technology has been collected/cleaned/locked up, and the speaking cards worked well and have already given me an accurate read on each student’s speaking abilities.

Some examples of finals of which I am more pleased are my Alma Spanish II midterm, Leyenda del espantapájaros Spanish II final, and Llorona Spanish II final. I need to sit down and find a film or cultural topic that works for Spanish I! Someday…

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3 thoughts on “Spanish A Final Exam

  1. Hi Martina,
    Do you do the listening portion of your exam first so that students can work at their own pace on the other sections? Also, how do you do your speaking assessments so that you are able to work through everyone in the class? Do you get it all done in one period?
    Thanks!
    Laura

    • Hi Laura,

      We have a block period for testing–it’s 1.5 hours, and so I only use one block. I don’t do the listening right at first; I will usually do it 1/3 of the way into the time period so that it breaks up the monotony of silence. I just tell kids to take a break from whatever they are currently working on, do the listening part together, and then return to the reading or writing. If I know I can get all of the speaking in in the 1.5 hour block, I call kids up during that time, but if not I do it throughout several class periods before the final. It would be nice to have kids record it on phones or in a computer lab, but because of school policies and limitations with technology, I never did that. What other questions do you have?

  2. Pingback: Summer plans | The Comprehensible Classroom

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