“Strip” Bingo

Get your students’ attention with the name of this quick version of BINGO!

OVERVIEW:

Turn a reading into a competitive game with this twist on traditional BINGO. I learned this activity from Kristin Duncan, who re-posted it on her blog after reading a post by Andrea (surname?) on the MoreTPRS listserv in March 2013.

PREPARATION:

  1. Teacher chooses a text or list of words/phrases in the target language. (If it is a text, pull out key words and phrases and show them to students in list form; If it is a list, show it to the students in scrambled order.)
  2. Students tear off a strip from a piece of paper. (To give you an idea, it could be 2” by 11”…but it really doesn’t matter.)
  3. Students divide the strip of paper into 5 boxes.
  4. Students write down one word or phrase from the teacher’s list in each box.

Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 10.29.21 PMGAME PLAY:

  1. The teacher SLOWLY reads aloud the text or list that contains the target language words and phrases from the list that students saw in preparation step #1.  (If it is a text, pause after each sentence or clause (if the sentences are long); If it is a list, pause after each item (word or phrase) in the list.)
  2. When the teacher pauses, ALL students call out what the word or phrase means in English
  3. If one of the words or phrases that was spoken before that pause is written on one end of a student’s paper (the far right or far left), that student can tear off that word or phrase from their strip. If it is one of the words or phrases in the middle of his or her strip, the student may not tear it off.
  4. The first person to have all of their words called and ripped off wins! You might have to read through the list several times in order to find a winner.
  • If you want to “guarantee” (more-or-less) that you will have to read through the text several times before there is a winner, have students make more than five boxes on their strip.
  • Remember that texts that are highly repetitious will make for a faster game, because students will have multiple opportunities to tear off the words and phrases that are repeated in the text. To avoid this, you could simply exclude the highest frequency vocabulary from the list given to students when creating their strips.

EXAMPLES:

Here is a ready-to-go version of the game with a reading to use on Day of the Dead. 

Profe Hanson used it to read Chapter 12 of La Llorona de Mazatlán. Her students chose five words from a word bank of nine words (mujer, enojada, chica, tía, miró, de repente, volver/volvió, había, oí) to write on their strip, and then she read the chapter aloud to them as they followed along in their novels.

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 10.24.51 PM

13 comments

  1. […] This one is more innocuous than it sounds! If you are planning to start off with an “About Me” presentation, or an intro to the syllabus or procedures, spice it up a little by with this one. Choose about 5-7 key words from your presentation, words that will be repeated frequently. Write those words on the board, and tell students to write them down in a horizontal row on a piece of paper, but in a random order. As you give your presentation, tell students they may tear off the key words as they hear them, but ONLY if the word is on the outer edge. If the word if blocked by a word to the left or the right, it can’t get torn off. The first student to tear off all the words gets a prize. (From from Martina Bex at the Comprehensible Classroom. […]

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