Back At’Cha

25553417I’m taking advantage of Ellis’ after-church nap to catch up on the blogs that I follow….

(By the way, Bob Lenz was the guest speaker at our church today, and this was maybe the third or fourth time that I heard him speak. He speaks at many schools about bullying, self-harm, substance abuse, and more, and I would highly recommend bringing him to YOUR school. He is hilarious and his message is powerful. (He has secular presentations in additions to the ones that he does for churches and youth groups.) He spoke at several schools in the Anchorage School District last year for school-wide assemblies–if there are hurting kids in your school (duh), he’s worth looking into.)

…and I read this post from Cynthia Hitz (@sonrisadelcampo). I like that the activity that she used gets the kids on their feet and is a team ‘game’ that is still low-anxiety. If you wanted to up the ante a little bit, you could turn it into a more formal game by awarding/subtracting points as follows:

  • Five (5) points for each NEW (previously unsaid) sentence from the story that is said by a team member that has NOT already contributed
  • Three (3) points for each NEW (previously unsaid) sentence from the story that is said by a team member that HAS ALREADY contributed.
  • One (1) point for each sentence from the story that has already been said, as long as it is said by someone that has NOT already contributed. Even though it’s a repeat, the goal is to get kids talking in a low-pressure situation and to get in repetitions of the structures.
  • Zero (0) points for each sentence from the story that has already been said, if it said by someone that HAS ALREADY contributed. This will prevent kids from just repeating one or two statements forever.

It’s a great activity to get in more reps of the structures!! You could also change the format so that students get more points for telling sentences in the correct order from the story, and fewer points if they are out of order. That way, you would be more likely to end up with a re-tell of the story, as opposed to fragmented repetitions of the structures.

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